Obama & Hillary: Call Christians Murdered in Sri Lanka Easter Worshipers

On this years Easter Weekend a Muslim Terrorist Group bombed several locations in Sri Lanka, killing hundreds of people in the process. The story continues to develop but so far Muslim Suicide Bombers took the lives of over 300 and wounded more than 400 after their attacks on three hotels, a housing complex, and three churches. A majority were killed attending church for Easter Sunday Service, Sri Lanka’s Government suspects that the Islamist terror group behind the attacks are called the National Thowfeek Jamaath. Among those killed or injured some happened to be tourists visiting Sri Lanka including Americans. After the attacks many rushed to social media to denounce the attacks against Catholics and Christians in Sri Lanka but Obama, Clinton, and other democrats including those who want to run for our 2020 presidential election refuse to identify the victims as such.

Former President Obama, Hilary Clinton, Julian Castro, Elizabeth Warren and other democrats referred to the victims of Sri Lanka this weekend as “Easter Worshipers”. It’s almost as if they couldn’t find that one simple word to describe these “Easter worshipers”… if only their was one word to describe them. Even ABC News and Main Stream media have decided to token the term “Easter Worshipers” just to avoid using the C word that apparently frightens them so much. I mean why is it that even Homeland Security refuses to acknowledge that Christians were murdered?

None of these Democrats have ever had an issue calling attacks on Muslims exactly what it is, an attack on Muslims or Islamophobia. Countless of times have they voiced themselves when it comes to the Islamic community and many times have they came to its defense. Granted, no one deserves this but to ignore the community that this effects by calling them Easter Worshipers really shows you what kind of people they are. There’s never been a time where Hillary or Obama referred to the Muslim community as the “Hijab Worshipers” or the “Ramadan Worshipers”. Why is it that they couldn’t bring themselves to simply say Christians, it was Christians and Catholics who were attacked and have been seeing a huge growth in persecution specifically by Muslim Terrorist groups all around the world. Christians are the highest persecuted Group around the world, but also the most ignored.

I’m not sure about you but as a Christian I find it very disrespectful to call us Easter Worshipers. I and no other Christian worships Easter, we worship Jesus Christ. After all the lives that were lost and all the people who were injured you dare to write a tweet referring to them as Easter Worshipers just to act like you care about Christians? The sad part is, these tweets look almost as if they were all on face-time group chat, one of them said “oh yeah, add Easter Worshipers so we won’t have to mention Christianity” and boom the tweets were formed. It’s just so ironic how all these tweets use the same phrase and say the same exact thing with different structure. You ever “copy” your friends essay but change up a few words, well there it is in these tweets. Democrats, you could try to ignore the fact that Christian persecution is real and its happening almost daily all you want but “Easter Worshipers”…Really… that’s just Shameful. I rather they not have said anything, none of you have ever fought against christian persecution don’t start acting like you care now just because the news is trending.

Honestly though, was there a memo sent out that the world should know about because the statistics behind all of this being accidental.. I’m pretty sure is close to some type of negative number. I guess that the left must believe that this is just another case of, some people who did something, to Easter Worshipers.

Written by Emmanuel Matos

What the Catholic Church Teaches Regarding Capital Punishment

By Penny Hoffmann

Capital punishment is a controversial ethical issue and has been for a long time. In Australia, there has been a recent ressurection of the desire to have the death penalty, and in response Catholic organisations in Australia and worldwide have a history of speaking in private and public arenas concerning this ethical issue. But what is an ethical issue, and what are the guiding principles that inform the Catholic perspective?

Ethics shape one’s values and are what people strive to believe in and put into practice in their everyday lives.

The Catholic Church’s values are shaped by the ethical teachings present in the Bible and authoritative texts and figures. A main ethical concept of the Catholic Church is the Consistent Ethic of Life, which can be explained by Jesus’ “Seemless Garment” where one can not be partly pro life, but instead fully pro-life for every ethical issue where life is relative.

The Consistent Ethic of Life is seen through the Church’s Principles of Catholic Social Teaching which include the Dignity of the Human Person, the Stewardship of Creation, Preferential Option for the Poor, the Common Good, Solidarity, and others. These guiding principles inform the Catholic perspective on ethical issues.

The Principles of Catholic Social Teaching that are applicable to the Church’s teachings on capital punishment include the Dignity of the Human Person and the Common Good. Regardless of age, sex, gender, crime, or anything else, one does not lose their dignity.

Branching from these Principles, other remonstrations that form the Church’s stance on capital punishment include that the death penalty does not allow time for people to repent, there may be judicial errors where someone who is innocent is sentenced to the death penalty, it is not a useful deterrent because criminals may assume that they will not be caught, there have been countless studies that prove that capital punishment is ineffective, and that capital punishment is done by humans instead of God.

Despite the Catholic Church’s teachings, there is still support within the Catholic community for capital punishment:

“Tiniest of cracks were used by Catholic death penalty advocates from Nebraska to the Philippines to claim that the church was not against it”.

The Catholic Church has undergone most of its change concerning the teachings on capital punishment over the last fifty years. For centuries, “the Church has allowed the death penalty for extreme cases”. However, Catholic authoritative figures such as Popes have declared that these extreme cases are so rare that there may as well be none and that there need not be support for it, and that “tiniest of cracks were used by Catholic death penalty advocates from Nebraska to the Philippines to claim that the church was not against it”.

According to the new teaching in the universal Catechism:

 “The Church teaches, in the light of the Gospel, that the death penalty is inadmissible because it is an attack on the Inviolability and Dignity of the Person and she works with determination for its abolition worldwide”.

According to an ABC news article published in August last year, in an accompanying letter that explained the amended stance, the head of the Vatican’s doctrine office stated that the Church’s position on capital punishment was an evolution of prior teaching and that it did not contradict past teachings.

An argument that is commonly used by those who do not find the dignity of a human person important is that criminals who murder do not display that they find the dignity of their victims important, so this cancels out their own life.

There are some situations and contexts which make following the Catholic teachings regarding capital punishment challenging to follow. An example is witnessing a criminal have no remorse for the most serious crimes such as murder. The church responds with teachings that these criminals may repent in the future and that God delivers justice to all.

In a secular world, the Catholic Church provides effective guidance regarding their teachings on capital punishment due to their presence in as many platforms as they can to promote Catholic teachings. These platforms include, but are not limited to, church, protests, blogs, social media, and the news.